S3E38 Cube chatShaala: Exploring new ways of Learning

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Timing:5.30 pm to 9.30 pm
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CUBE ChatShaala on 16th December 2020
44 CUBists from 34 Centres had joined the webinar
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INDIA
ANDHRA PRADESH
Guntur: Suma Swarajya Lakshmi
Nellore: Tejasree, Ujwalaraj

ASSAM
Narsing High School, Silchar: Hasina Begam, Krishnendu Roy
Sonari: Susanta Tanti

DADRA AND NAGAR HAVELI
Silvassa: Jeene Jimmy

DELHI
Dyal Singh College: Dr P. Chitralekha
AND College: Dr Sarita Kumar
Kirori Mal College: Dr Yamal Gupta

JHARKHAND
Kokar, Ranchi: Man Masih Beck
Morabadi, Ranchi: Rechel Tirkey, Dr Shalini Lal
Ranchi: Suraj Kumar

KERALA
Ernakulam: Ashikha Farzana, Bhavya, Devika Devanath, Essabell Philomina, Manjula Bhat
Kozhikode: Arunima
Thriprayar, Thrissur: Aswathy Suresh
Kandassankadavu: Lakshmy PJ
Thrissur: Rayis
Thanniam, Thrissur: Sidhy PP
Alapad, Thrissur: Vishnupriya

MADHYA PRADESH
Gwalior: Komal Singh

MAHARASHTRA
South Bombay: Arunan MC
Nerul: Drishtant M Kawale
HBCSE, Mumbai: DP
Mumbai: Kaninika Ghosh
Powai: Lydia Mathew
Titwala: Ritik Baviskar
Bandra, Mumbai: Saida Sayyed
Panvel, Navi Mumbai: Shraddha Sonavane
Prabhadevi, Mumbai: Yash Sheregare

TAMIL NADU
Chennai: Anjali Chauhan, Anu Kiruthika

UTTAR PRADESH
Kanpur: Bareera Javed, Hina Mudgal
Moradabad: Kiran Yadav

WEST BENGAL
Garden High School, Kalyani: Aranyak Sarma
Kolkata: Batul Pipewala, Sukriti Maity

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
University of Alabama: Anil Challa

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Whiteboard screenshot ( 16/12/2020 ) CUBE CHATSHAALA

We had discussed abot the Sleep wake cycle of Phyllanthus plant and activity pattern of fruit flies.
We had tried to make the connection in between plant and animal by observing data taken by @⁨Aswathy Cube Butterfly⁩ on activity pattern of fruit flies and by @⁨Lakshmi PJ SN Nattika Phyllanthus⁩ on sleep wake pattern of Phyllanthus plant…

Why Phyllanthus plant has been choosen as a model system to study Sleep wake cycle of Phyllanthus??.
What are the other plants that shows folding and unfolding of leaves like Phyllanthus?..

Is there any taxonomic similarity among all the plants shows folding and unfolding of leaves?..

It’s great to have relavent reference for our study… References shared during the chatshaala…

1.Leaves display constant and complex movements. We found that the petioles of undamaged leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana undergo minute deformations when insects fed on other leaves. These deformations reported in real time the arrival and architecture of damage-triggered electrical signals called slow wave potentials.
https://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066

2.Insect-damaged Arabidopsis moves like wounded Mimosa pudicahttps://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066

J. C. Bose elegantly highlighted the fact that many plant movements “escape our scrutiny” (1). Bose’s text refers in part to slow, tropic movements now known to depend on hormone-controlled differential tissue growth https://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066

Leaves display constant and complex movements. We found that the petioles of undamaged leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana undergo minute deformations when insects fed on other leaves. These deformations reported in real time the arrival and architecture of damage-triggered electrical signals called slow wave potentials.https://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066

Insect-damaged Arabidopsis moves like wounded Mimosa pudicahttps://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066
Arunan:J. C. Bose elegantly highlighted the fact that many plant movements “escape our scrutiny” (1). Bose’s text refers in part to slow, tropic movements now known to depend on hormone-controlled differential tissue growthhttps://www.pnas.org/content/116/51/26066

For many years we have known that living organisms, including humans, have an internal, biological clock that helps them anticipate and adapt to the regular rhythm of the day. But how does this clock actually work? Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young were able to peek inside our biological clock and elucidate its inner workings. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2017/press-release/

3.Our inner clock Most living organisms anticipate and adapt to daily changes in the environment. During the 18th century, the astronomer Jean Jacques d’Ortous de Mairan studied mimosa plants, and found that the leaves opened towards the sun during daytime and closed at dusk. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2017/press-release/

4.It is interesting to overlap the Phyllanthus and Drosophila activity graphs. It reminds me of ethnoecological classifications in some cultures. How Folk Classification Interacts with Ethnoecological Knowledge: A Case Study from Chiapas, Mexico https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/154459086.pdf